Sharing songs of the Bear Dance

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The youth were encouraged to select a growler that they would keep for the Bear Dance. As each student picked out their own growler, Ryder emphasized that each one was different and unique in its own way, but also equal to the others.
Tim Ryder used brand new axe handles to fashion wooden growlers for the participating students ahead of time.
Bear Dance singers, Jake and Tim Ryder, sing together on a small portable growler box at SunUte Park — sharing Bear Dance songs with the youth in attendance.
Students were encouraged to wear masks and social distance, as they practiced using their growlers and sang Bear Dance songs at SunUte Park.
Jeremy Wade Shockley | SU Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | SU Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | SU Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | SU Drum
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Brothers and Bear Dance singers, Jake and Tim Ryder, invited a group of young boys to learn about the cultural etiquette for singing at the Bear Dance. The small workshop was organized by Daisy Bluestar and held at SunUte Park, Sunday, May 23.  The singers were sharing their knowledge of the Bear Dance songs with the younger generation, who came to receive instruction. They stressed the importance of keeping the old songs alive, as well as the new ones, while also respecting the traditional ways of the Bear Dance. They emphasized that the growlers were not toys, and should be treated with respect, and safely stowed until it was time for the Bear Dance each spring — it would be the reasonability of the young men to care for their growlers.

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