Longwell, Moore recognized for longtime service with federal government

Southern Ute Natural Resources Director, Lena Atencio presented each of the retirees with a large handmade dish and mug set crafted by local Ute Mountain Ute artisans — inscribed with their years of service, Friday, Dec. 20.
Long time colleagues: Lalena Weasel, Materials Engineer Technician with the Navajo-Gallup water supply, Jim Formea Sr., former DNR Director, and Lena Atencio, current Southern Ute Natural Resources Director, catch up during the farewell reception in Farmington, N.M.
Linda Moore receives her 40-year career service certificate from the Bureau of Reclamation, Friday, Dec. 20.
The Bureau of Reclamation recognized, Barry Longwell and Linda Moore for their service and dedication at a joint retirement party hosted at the Four Corners Construction Office in Farmington, N.M. — Friday, Dec. 20.
Jeremy Wade Shockley | The Southern Ute Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | The Southern Ute Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | The Southern Ute Drum
Jeremy Wade Shockley | The Southern Ute Drum

Long time Bureau of Reclamation employees, Barry Longwell and Linda Moore were recognized for their service and dedication at a joint retirement party hosted at the Four Corners Construction Office on Friday, Dec. 20 in Farmington, N.M.

Longwell and Moore each worked on the Animas La-Plata project during their tenors with the federal government, each of their careers spanning 34 and 40 years respectively.

The Animas-La Plata water project is a water project which was designed to fulfill the water rights settlement of the Southern Ute Indian and Ute Mountain Ute Indian Tribes. While the funding and authorization process for ALP goes back over half a century, actual construction on the project did not start until 2002. Final steps in the construction officially came to a close in 2013.

Lake Nighthorse provides water storage for tribal and water right claim-holders along the Animas River, as stipulated by the Animas La-Plata project.

Nighthorse was formally dedicated by members of the Colorado Ute tribes, City of Durango and Bureau of Reclamation in May of 2018. The reservoir, located in Ridges Basin, sits southwest of Durango. The reservoir opened for recreation in April following the dedication.

Southern Ute Natural Resources Director, Lena Atencio was one of many who travelled to New Mexico to wish these two college the best on their future endeavors; giving each of them a large handmade dish and mug set crafted by local Ute Mountain Ute artisans.

Longwell reflected on his years with the federal government, working on what he described as, “life changing projects — I couldn’t ask for more out of a career.”

“I admire anyone who can work 35-40 years with the federal government,” said Jim Dunlap. “Barry worked a long time for the Bureau of Reclamation, and he did it very well.”

Moore was described by USBR colleague, Pat Paige, as a “Budget Guru” — referring to her superb skills in keeping large-scale federal projects on time and on budget. Moore transitioned from the ALP project later in her career to work on the New Mexico based Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project. She began working with Reclamation in 1979.

Longwell and Moore both received recognition in the form of career service certificates from the Bureau of Reclamation, whose motto is: Managing Water in the West. This work has never been more important— especially in the communities of Colorado and New Mexico, which these projects serve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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