Ute Mountain Ute hosts Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs meeting

Colorado Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera address attendees at the Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance opening day held in Towaoc, Colo. on May 31.
Lt. Governor Primavera was gifted a Bear Dance skirt by Rudley and Zelda Weaver, so she was able to dance one of the first dances of this year’s Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance.
Members of Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council, CCIA Commission and Ute Mountain Ute Royalty all pose for a quick group shot after Bear Dancing.
Ute Mountain Ute Councilwoman, DeAnne House pins Lt. Governor Primavera’s shawl on her before she gets ready to choose a Bear Dance partner.
Southern Ute, Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council members, Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs members, and journalists from the Weenuche Smoke Signals and The Southern Ute Drum tribal newspapers enjoyed a dinner with Colo. Lt. Governor Primavera at Shilo’s Steak House in Cortez, Colo.
Program Manager at Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs, Morgan Ferris and Southern Ute Vice-Chairwoman, Cheryl Frost break bread at the CCIA steak dinner at Shilo's Steakhouse in Cortez, Colo.
Southern Ute Vice-Chairwoman, Cheryl Frost gives a brief introduction and welcome at Shilo's Steakhouse in Cortez, Colo.
Ute Mountain Ute Executive Director, Andrew Frost, Ignacio School District Superintendent Rocco Fuschetto, and Southern Ute Councilwoman, Lorelei Cloud listen as guests give introductions.
Ignacio School District Superintendent, Rocco Fuschetto introduces himself and gives appreciation to the Southern Ute Drum.
Southern Ute Tribal Councilman, Adam Red joined Colorado Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera and other Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs members for dinner at Shilo’s Steak House in Cortez, Colo.
Ute Mountain Ute Executive Director, Andrew Frost welcomes Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs members and Southern Ute Tribal Councilmembers to Towaoc for their annual bear dance.
Southern Ute Tribal Council members Cheryl Frost, Adam Red and Lorelei Cloud, Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman Colleen Cuthair-Root, Ute Mountain Ute Executive Director Andrew Frost, join Colo. Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera and Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs members joined for dinner.
Southern Ute Tribal Council members, Cheryl Frost, Lorelei Cloud and Adam Red joined Colorado Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera for dinner at Shilo’s Steak House in Cortez, Colo. Thursday, May 30, the evening before the 4th Quarter CCIA meeting, which coincides with the annual Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance in Towaoc, Colo.
Ute Mountain Ute Executive Director Andrew Frost, and Southern Ute Culture Director, Edward Box III chat while awaiting their chance to bear dance at the Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance in Towoac, Colo.
Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilmembers, DeAnne House and Chairman Harold Cuthair, along with Southern Ute Tribal Councilman Adam Red, listen as Colo. Lt. Governor Pimavera thanked the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe for welcoming the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs to their annual Bear Dance.
Southern Ute Tribal Councilman Adam Red thanked the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe with Colo. Lt. Governor Pimavera and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilmembers, DeAnne House and Chairman Harold Cuthair.
Colorado Lt. Governor Primavera, and delegates of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs (CCIA) listen to instructions from Ute Mountain Ute "Catman," of the annual Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance in Towaoc, Colo.
Colorado Lt. Governor Primavera, and delegates of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs (CCIA), and Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councils join the Ute Mountain Ute "Bushwackers" Youth program participants in opening the first day of the annual Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance in Towaoc, Colo.
Taking a break after the morning session of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs 4th quarterly meeting, Lt. Governor Primavera and entourage smile as they prepare to Bear Dance with their chosen partners.
Colorado Lt. Governor Primavera, and delegates of the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs (CCIA), and Southern Ute and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councils join the Ute Mountain Ute "Bushwackers" Youth program participants in opening the first day of the annual Ute Mountain Ute Bear Dance in Towaoc, Colo.
Former ute Mountain Ute Chairman Manuel Heart does double-duty as he was picked to dance with Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs Program Manager Morgan Ferris, and DORA's Deputy Executive Director, Patty Salazar
Southern Ute Cultural Preservation Director, Edward Box III and Cultural Preservation NAGPRA Coordinator, Cassandra Atencio prepare to present joint-letters from the Ute Tribes, dismissing the “Prayer Tree” as culturally significant to the Ute tribes.
Colorado Lt. Governor Primavera listens intently as Southern Ute Vice-Chairwoman Cheryl Frost addresses the CCIA meeting attendees, along with councilmembers Adam Red, and Cedric Chavez at the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs 4th Quarter meeting in Towaoc, Colo.
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | SU Drum

The quarterly Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs (CCIA) Meeting was held on Friday, May 31, at the Ute Mountain Ute Casino. Representation from the Southern Ute Indian Tribe, Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera along with others who sit on the commission were all in attendance.

CCIA Executive Director

After a few months of searching the Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs finally found a new Executive Director, Gwen Leaffe Carr after former director Ernest House Jr. vacated the position in 2018.

Carr is an enrolled member of the Cayuga Nation of New York, Heron Clan. Her career has taken her in the direction of social justice and service to American Indians, with many years of experience working with tribal, state and federal governments.

CCIA is the official liaison between the State and sovereign tribal governments which fosters strong government-to-government relations. One of the goals of CCIA is to ensure direct contact with the tribes in Colorado.

Carr was available by phone and was able to give her Executive Director Report.

“I am very honored to be the executive director of the CCIA. I have had just wonderful experiences with the members, tribes and everyone else,” Carr exclaimed.

Carr reported on several things that will impact both the Southern Ute Indian Tribe and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. She is currently looking into hemp manufacturing and has been in discussion with individuals and business who have been in the hemp business for 20+ years. Carr is specifically interested in industrial hemp and the uses.

“I want to focus on starting off long term sustainability for economic development for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe and The Southern Utes,” said Carr.

In April, Carr was able to come to Colorado and visit both Ute tribes.

“It was a thing of beauty, it made me tear up a little bit,” she proclaimed about her visit to the Southern Ute Montessori Academy, “To see little kids be able to learn their language in a Montessori school, again it was a continuation of what we are supposed to do as indigenous people.”

Ute Mountain Ute Update

The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe has a solar project in the field next to the Ute Mountain Ute Casino, which will provide credit to the community for the electric services provided.

“It’s small, it’s for the community to allow our community members to get positive services from the electric services we use,” said DeAnne House, Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman.

The Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council is also looking to venture into bigger solar projects, including one large commercial solar project which is in the feasibility stages right now.

“We are getting better at finding these opportunities” said House.

At the end of July, the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe will get to see their new Behavior Health Center put into play.

Home rehabilitations were also a big positive for the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, they received money from a federal grant to rehab five homes by September of this year.

Southern Ute Indian Tribe Update

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe had 17 Southern Ute tribal members and JOM students graduate from Ignacio High School, along with a few others from other schools off the reservation.

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe also had 7seven college graduates. Three with master’s degrees, two with bachelor’s and two with an associate’s degree.

“I think it’s important that we continue to educate our younger people, they truly are the future,” said Southern Ute Vice-Chairman, Cheryl Frost.

Tribal Council did allocate a budget for the new skate park. The construction and project management department is currently working with contractors on a design, which will have to be approved by the Southern Ute Tribal Council and the Sunshine Cloud Smith Youth Advisory Council.

The Southern Ute Growth Fund has hired a new director of energy, John Stafford. Red Willow Production Company has also established an EHS1 tech trainee position, for tribal members only and a great opportunity to work with and for the Tribe.

Another big topic of discussion for the Southern Ute Tribe is sports betting. Allowing sports betting on the reservation has long been talked about, but will all depend on this year’s election cycle; sports betting will be on the fall ballot.

One of the major topics of discussion for bill H1327 is the required tax increase it comes with which is 10 percent.  In order to acquire sports betting, the Southern Ute Indian Tribe would need to submit an application for a master license which would last two years, the cost of the license is not yet known.

“Thank the tribes and the departments who came. I won’t forget the Bear Dance ever, that was really fun and looking forward to next year,” said Lt. Governor Primavera “We’re going to continue to grow and learn and make things better.”

The next Colorado Commission of Indian Affairs meeting will be held in September on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in Ignacio, Colo.

 

 

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