NAJA releases Inuktitut translated Inuit Media Guide to celebrate UN Decade of Indigenous Languages  

NAJA

The Native American Journalists Association is proud to release our Inuktitut translated Inuit Media Guide for the launch of the UN Decade of Indigenous Languages. 

“We believe that journalism and Indigenous storytelling contributes to the reclamation of our languages. Which is why we wanted to share something special like this. We are starting with Inuktitut today but there’s more to come,” said Francine Compton, NAJA President and a citizen of Sandy Bay Ojibway First Nation. 

Reporting on Inuit Communities in Nunavut, Canada, effectively requires an understanding of their respective government, people, history, art and environment. NAJA’s Inuit Media Guide is a tool for journalists to learn about the complexities of their varied communities and has been translated to Inuktitut in honor of preserving Indigenous languages.  

The United Nations General Assembly (Resolution A/RES/74/135) proclaimed the period between 2022 and 2032 as the International Decade of Indigenous Languages (IDIL 2022-2032), to draw global attention on the critical situation of many Indigenous languages and to mobilize stakeholders and resources for their preservation, revitalization and promotion. 

The proclamation of an International Decade is a key outcome of the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages, for which the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) lead global efforts. 

NAJA thanks our partners at the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and APTN News. 

About the Native American Journalists Association 

NAJA serves more than 1,000 members, including media professionals working in tribal, freelance, independent and mainstream news outlets, as well as academia and students covering Indigenous communities and representing tribal nations from across North America. 

 

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