Tribe hosts culture preservation conference

Attendees at the 18th Annual National Tribal Preservation Conference hosted by the Southern Ute Indian Tribe August 29 - September 2.
Brianna GoodTracks and Vice Chairwoman Lorelei Cloud Bear Dance in the Culture Night held at the Multi Purpose Facility on August 31.
Southern Ute tribal women perform the Lame Dance for a crowd at the National Tribal Preservation Conference Cultural Night.
Sacha Smith | The Southern Ute Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum
Trennie Collins | The Southern Ute Drum

 

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe hosted the 18th annual National Tribal Preservation Organization (NATHPO) Conference Aug. 30-Sept. 2. at the Sky Ute Casino Resort.

Chairman Clement J. Frost welcomed the group of tribal and federal representatives to the 5-day event and encouraged them to take back valuable information about culture preservation to their tribes.

“We must protect remains of our ancestors. We as Indian people know the importance of our people,” he said.

NATHPO was founded in 1998 and is a national non-profit membership organization of tribal government officials who implement federal and tribal preservation laws. The organization aims to preserve, maintain and revitalize the culture of Native Americans.

At the conference attendees heard from different speakers that talked about issues relating to culture preservation including the Pueblo of Acoma’s efforts to repatriate a sacred shield from Paris, France; the Intertribal Effort to Create Bears Ears National Monument; and getting Ute Culture in Utah National Parks.

Alden Naranjo, Southern Ute NAGPRA coordinator spoke about how the Southern Ute and Ute Indian Tribe recently participated in Ethnographic Overview and Assessment studies in Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park with the purpose of bringing the Ute voice to the parks. The studies identified places, plants, and artifacts that are of cultural significance to the Ute people.

The tribe also shared a bit of the Ute culture with conference guests. On Wednesday, Aug. 31 the tribe hosted a culture night for all the guests at the Southern Ute Multi-Purpose Facility. Guests got to enjoy a meal and witness the Lame Dance being preformed as well as participate in a Bear Dance presentation.

 

The Southern Ute Indian Tribe hosted the 18th annual National Tribal Preservation Organization (NATHPO) Conference Aug. 30-Sept. 2. at the Sky Ute Casino Resort.

Chairman Clement J. Frost welcomed the group of tribal and federal representatives to the 5-day event and encouraged them to take back valuable information about culture preservation to their tribes.

“We must protect remains of our ancestors. We as Indian people know the importance of our people,” he said.

NATHPO was founded in 1998 and is a national non-profit membership organization of tribal government officials who implement federal and tribal preservation laws. The organization aims to preserve, maintain and revitalize the culture of Native Americans.

At the conference attendees heard from different speakers that talked about issues relating to culture preservation including the Pueblo of Acoma’s efforts to repatriate a sacred shield from Paris, France; the Intertribal Effort to Create Bears Ears National Monument; and getting Ute Culture in Utah National Parks.

Alden Naranjo, Southern Ute NAGPRA coordinator spoke about how the Southern Ute and Ute Indian Tribe recently participated in Ethnographic Overview and Assessment studies in Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park with the purpose of bringing the Ute voice to the parks. The studies identified places, plants, and artifacts that are of cultural significance to the Ute people.

The tribe also shared a bit of the Ute culture with conference guests. On Wednesday, Aug. 31 the tribe hosted a culture night for all the guests at the Southern Ute Multi-Purpose Facility. Guests got to enjoy a meal and witness the Lame Dance being preformed as well as participate in a Bear Dance presentation.

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