Under new name, rally turns a small profit

Four Corners and Ignacio locals
The parking lot of the Sky Ute Fairgrounds
Mike Lorenzini Memorial Bike Show
Mel Silva and Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Staff members of the Southern Ute Cultural Center & Museum
Bridgett works hard pressing lemons
Lights on For Safety of Shiprock, N.M.
Durango’s own Morbid Justice
Signal 99 of Farmington, N.M.
Rock band Until Chaos
Kyle Dalton of Morbid Justice/Skull Theory
A guitar Shredders Contest
A metal babe holds a guitar
Mohawked dudes and pin-up girls
Lisa Labato of Aztec, N.M.
The Four Corners Motorcycle Rally Biker Babes
The original horsepower
Six-year-old Southern Ute tribal member Derek Sage
Even the young had a bouncing-good-time
Employees of the Sky Ute Casino Resort
Randy Baker and wife Marlene
Andrew Frost and Lisa Burch drew playing cards
rally girls gathered courage and strength
the ropes and the reins and the joy and the pain
Caravanserai, a Santana tribute band
Penny Hill of Washington state
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Four Corners and Ignacio locals straddled their iron horses and participated in the Durango Motorcycle and Classic Car Parade, Sunday, Sept. 1.
The parking lot of the Sky Ute Fairgrounds, designated “Rally Central,” saw a steady flow of bikes coming and going during the five-day rally.
Rally participants gather around for the Mike Lorenzini Memorial Bike Show on Saturday, Aug. 31 at the Sky Ute Fairgrounds.
Four Corners Motorcycle Rally organizer Mel Silva and Former U.S. Senator for Colorado Ben Nighthorse Campbell, both Ignacio area residents, visit in the Sky Ute Fairgrounds. Nighthorse was involved in Ignacio’s earliest rallies more than 20 years ago.
Staff members of the Southern Ute Cultural Center & Museum raffled a Honda ATV during the rally. Blenda Ortiz sits atop the ATV to assist in raising money for the museum. The museum will continue the raffle through Oct. 31. Tickets can be purchased at the museum.
Bridgett works hard pressing lemons, limes and oranges to create the Texas Twister.
Lights on For Safety of Shiprock, N.M., opened Metal Night, playing a cover song of Cyndi Lauper's "Time After Time".
Durango’s own Morbid Justice brought the thrash to “Metal Night.” Morbid Justice will be playing during the Southern Ute Tribal Fair Youth Concert, Saturday, Sept. 14 in Ignacio.
Signal 99 of Farmington, N.M., rocked Metal Night with songs such as Candy and Zombie Star,
Rock band Until Chaos thrilled metal heads during the rally’s first-ever “Metal Night” on Thursday, Aug. 29. Until Chaos will return to Ignacio on Sept. 14 for the Southern Ute Tribal Fair Youth Concert, “Native REZ-olution 5.”
Kyle Dalton of Morbid Justice/Skull Theory shreds the fretboard of his guitar as fellow competitor and bandmate, Logan Gasdia of Morbid Justice poses in reverence behind Kyle.
A guitar Shredders Contest was held during Metal Night. Phil of Skull Theory (holding guitar) was crowned the best shredder of the rally. Wayne Reichert of Wayne's World Class Instruments, of Cortez, donated the B.C. Warlock guitar.
A metal babe holds a guitar and smiles for the camera during the Metal Night at the Four Corners Motorcycle Rally.
Mohawked dudes and pin-up girls were in the audience during Metal Night.
Lisa Labato of Aztec, N.M., strutted her stuff during the “Pin-Up Girl” contest Thursday, Aug. 29.
The Four Corners Motorcycle Rally, Rally Girls, strapped up and test their skills in climbing at Rally Central
The original horsepower, seen here – as a two-horse-powered chassis – made its way through the streets of Durango during the Four Corners Motorcycle Rally.
Six-year-old Southern Ute tribal member Derek Sage didn’t need to be coaxed into riding the mechanical bull at Rally Central on Saturday, Aug. 31. He wanted to ride, said his dad, Roger Sage Jr.
Even the young had a "bouncing-good-time" at the Four Corners Motorcycle Rally.
Employees of the Sky Ute Casino Resort gather outside the casino for the afternoon barbecue sale during an outdoor concert Saturday. Aug. 31.
Randy Baker and wife Marlene cruise Main Street in Durango on their trike during the Durango Motorcycle and Classic Car Parade, Sunday, Sept. 1.
Andrew Frost and Lisa Burch drew playing cards at the Durango Harley-Davidson on Sunday, Sept. 1 for the Mayor’s Poker Run. The proceeds of the run went to local breast cancer care. The winner of the best hand won a diamond bracelet of 14-karat white gold, valued at $5,200 and donated by Taylor Raymond Jewelers of Durango.
Even rally girls gathered courage and strength to ride the mechanical bull at Rally Central.
It’s “the ropes and the reins and the joy and the pain,” as Southern Ute tribal member Alex Pena can attest, during the biker bull-riding in the Sky Ute Fairgrounds arena.
Caravanserai, a Santana tribute band based in San Francisco, bring down the house with Latin rock at the Sky Ute Fairgrounds on Sunday, Sept. 1.
Penny Hill of Washington state cheers after winning a Harley-Davidson Super Glide Custom at the Four Corners Motorcycle Rally on Sunday, Sept. 1. Hill was one of 10 semifinalists who received a bike key during the rally; hers ultimately started the bike on the last night.
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Christopher R. Rizzo | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Christopher R. Rizzo | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Robert L. Ortiz | The Southern Ute Drum
Ace Stryker | Southern Ute Drum
Ace Stryker | Southern Ute Drum
Thumbnail image of Four Corners and Ignacio locals
Thumbnail image of The parking lot of the Sky Ute Fairgrounds
Thumbnail image of Mike Lorenzini Memorial Bike Show
Thumbnail image of Mel Silva and Ben Nighthorse Campbell
Thumbnail image of Staff members of the Southern Ute Cultural Center & Museum
Thumbnail image of Bridgett works hard pressing lemons
Thumbnail image of Lights on For Safety of Shiprock, N.M.
Thumbnail image of Durango’s own Morbid Justice
Thumbnail image of Signal 99 of Farmington, N.M.
Thumbnail image of Rock band Until Chaos
Thumbnail image of Kyle Dalton of Morbid Justice/Skull Theory
Thumbnail image of A guitar Shredders Contest
Thumbnail image of A metal babe holds a guitar
Thumbnail image of Mohawked dudes and pin-up girls
Thumbnail image of Lisa Labato of Aztec, N.M.
Thumbnail image of The Four Corners Motorcycle Rally Biker Babes
Thumbnail image of The original horsepower
Thumbnail image of
Thumbnail image of Six-year-old Southern Ute tribal member Derek Sage
Thumbnail image of Even the young had a bouncing-good-time
Thumbnail image of Employees of the Sky Ute Casino Resort
Thumbnail image of Randy Baker and wife Marlene
Thumbnail image of Andrew Frost and Lisa Burch drew playing cards
Thumbnail image of rally girls gathered courage and strength
Thumbnail image of the ropes and the reins and the joy and the pain
Thumbnail image of Caravanserai, a Santana tribute band
Thumbnail image of Penny Hill of Washington state
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The Four Corners Motorcycle Rally had a much better year than did its predecessor, Ignacio Bike Week, last year, according to its manager – but even with approximately $20,000 in profit, organizers must look to next year to fully cover the losses from the 2012 event.

This year’s rally, which took place Aug. 29-Sept. 2, cost upwards of $140,000 to produce, according to financials provided by Ignacio Chamber Events LLC. It brought between 5,500 and 6,000 attendees into the Sky Ute Fairgrounds, said Manager Johnny Valdez. Rally profits come primarily from gate fees, drink sales, vendor fees and sponsorships.

“We definitely had a good year. We turned a profit,” Valdez said. “We saw a really huge turnaround.”

Last year, Ignacio Bike Week feel deep into the red, losing about $80,000 in total. Valdez has attributed that to the fatal mistake of internal competition – there were essentially two venues, a free one in downtown Ignacio and a paid one in the fairgrounds – which was corrected this year by moving everything inside the fairgrounds.

That, combined with improved events and preparation that began earlier in the year, made the difference this time around, Valdez said.

“We lost $80,000 last year; this year, we made $20,000,” he said. “It’s a $100,000 swing at a minimum.”

Final numbers will be available in time for a report to the Ignacio Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday, Sept. 11, he said.

But because of obligations to repay some of last year’s debt this year, the bottom line for the 2013 rally will still be negative, Valdez said. Nevertheless, he said he will recommend to the chamber that preparations begin on next year’s rally.

“It’s proven itself to be a positive, a thing that can be done every year,” he said. “We’ll just simply have to work together to come up with a viable plan.”

Valdez said several events, including biker bull-riding, field games, and various adult-themed evening activities, were a hit this year. Other events need work, he said, “not in a drastic way but in a way that I thought really could have improved the enjoyment.” He said he will seek more event sponsorships next year to improve the awards given.

Valdez said feedback was mostly positive, though he did hear from some attendees and vendors who wanted the $15-a-day gate fee lowered or eliminated.

“People want a free event,” he said, adding that such a move is impractical in the rally’s current state. It’s possible that free events could return if future rallies continue to recover and attendance improves, he said.

Feedback on the rally’s Facebook page was mixed. Several people left comments like “Had a blast! What a great job by everyone,” and “The best year yet!” while another said “After paying $60, bought a $3 Coke and left.”

“The one thing that’s the most important, really, is to thank all the community, the volunteers and the sponsors,” Valdez said. “We really appreciate everything that they did and all of the hard work of everybody.”

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