Teaching youth about wildlife

Curtis WhiteThunder attempts to catch the fish that slipped out of Wildlife Fisheries Biologist, Ben Zimmerman’s hands. Zimmerman completed an electroshocking presentation to show the E.L.K.S Program kids and caught multiple species of fish for them to examine and hold on Tuesday, June 11 at Scott’s Pond.
Ben Zimmerman gives a fishing net to a participant of the Environmental Leadership and Knowledge Seminar (ELKS) program to take to Scott’s Pond on Wednesday, June 12. The Wildlife Department taught the kids how the Tribe restocks fish.
Keelyn Reynolds takes a fish to release in Scott’s Pond on Wednesday, June 12.
Toph Pinnecoose a participant in the ELKS Program, shows off her fish before she puts it in Scott’s Pond on Wednesday, June 12. The Tribe’s Wildlife Department showed the kids how to restock fish by stunning them with electricity and collecting them before measuring and releasing them back into the pond.
Nakai Box and Davain Herrera rush to catch some soda in their mouth while experimenting during the E.L.K.S Program on Wednesday, June 12. The students each dropped seven Mentos mints into one-gallon bottles of soda to create “Mentos Geysers.”
Sinaav Larry and KJ Reynolds catch a rainbow trout together and measure the fish with the help of Wildlife Fisheries Biologist, Ben Zimmerman. Zimmerman gathered different fish using electroshocking so students that attended the E.L.K.S program could learn about the tagging and breeding process.
KJ Reynolds shows off his brand-new fishing pole that the Wildlife Fisheries Department had given each E.L.K.S student after their presentation at Scott’s Pond on Tuesday, June 11.
McKayla Lee | The Southern Ute Drum
Elijah Weaver | Youth Employment Worker
Elijah Weaver | Youth Employment Worker
Elijah Weaver | Youth Employment Worker
McKayla Lee | The Southern Ute Drum
McKayla Lee | The Southern Ute Drum
McKayla Lee | The Southern Ute Drum

Each year, the Southern Ute Environmental Programs Division hosts the Environmental Leadership and Knowledge Seminar (E.L.K.S). The seminar was open to all local Native American youth between the ages of nine and twelve years old. Each student was given the opportunity to learn about environmental issues and they created their own environmental awareness through hands on demonstrations and participated in field trips to local rivers and ponds. The outdoor youth program began on Tuesday, June 11 and ended Wednesday, June 12.

 

 

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